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Gallery

Tha an duileag seo lan le dealbhan snog agus alainn bho Geograph a chaidh a thugadh anns a Ghaidhealtachd, a chuid as mogha anns an Eilean Sgitheanach.


Poll Start Date: 28th August 2010

[http://www.geograph.org.uk/search.php?i=32170346&displayclass=slidebig]

It would be helpful to the website and to gauge interests if  visitors without a query in the form of a post could complete the survey:

http://www.geograph.org.uk/search.php?i=32176380&page=1&displayclass=slide

http://aroundguides.com/17615972

Photoshoots

Uist
Solas, North Uist
Eaval, North Uist
Flodday, North Uist
Rubha Ghaisinis, South Uist
Bornish Machair, South Uist
Flora MacDonald Cairn, South Uist
Eilean Chreamh, South Uist
Loch Boisdale, South Uist

 Skye
Loch Bracadale
Loch Scavaig
Suidhe Biorach
Drinan
Dunscaith
Sound of Sleat
Creag na Bruaich, Raasay
Sligachan
Trotternish
Castle Ewen
Loch Snizort

Mull
Aoineadh Beag
Moy Castle
Sound of Mull

Harris and Lewis
Eilean Reinis
Corran Ra
Taransay
Horgabost
Uig
Baile na Cille
Loch Thonagro
Shawbost Norse Mill
Niosaboist
Iosaigh
Mealasta
Tamansbhal

Islay, Colonsay and Jura
Creag an t-Saighdeir
Beinn Mhor
Ardfernal
Ballimony
Rubha nan Crann
Lagg
Oronsay
Beinn nan Caorach
Colonsay House
Port Mor
An Rubha
Kiloran Bay
Port a Chapuill
Hangman’s Rock
Garta Ghoban

MAPS (courtesy of Mary Cornell)

The world’s single largest online collection of historical maps was launched recently earlier this week at Old Maps Online . By the end of the year, the site aims to have 60,000 maps available for public access. Cooperating institutions include the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the Czech Republic’s Moravian Library and the San Francisco Bay Area’s David Rumsey Map Collection. The University of Portsmouth  . Great Britain Historical Geographical Information System  hosts the collection in conjunction with Switzerland’s Klokan Technologies.

FAMILY TREES

These PDF Family Trees have been constructed to show at a glance, within four generations, the holes in the genealogy of the person of primary interest to the family researcher. The Family Trees have many blanks but, once filled, should give a solid basis from which to work back and forward.

NaGrudaireanPDF
Rather than brewers of beer, these were the illicit whisky distillers who supplied the local trade and Alexander Carmichael was ‘an geidseir’, the Revenue Officer at Creagorry just down the road so the two were natural enemies (Angus MacMillan 2011/05/31 at 11:25 am | In reply to Anita Surphlis).

BulawayoX  Submitted by Deb Munks (nee MacLean) on 2009  /02/10 at 4:42 pm
Greetings from County Cork!  I have only recently started looking for info on my ancestors of North Uist, (Houghharry), namely MacLean and have come unstuck.

EffieX  Submitted on 2010/04/05 at 2:32 am by Sandra MacIsaac.
I am seeking information regarding a Donald Morrison who immigrated from Scotland to the North River area of St. Ann’s, Victoria County, Cape Breton Island in 1858. Shortly after his arrival, he married Mary Matheson d/o John Matheson of Lewis and Effie Ann McLeod of Harris. At the age of 80 years, Donald was still very much alive and residing at North River, St. Ann’s. I would like to know more about Donald’s history pre his 1858 arrival in Canada.

MacDonaldsIochdar

UistStewarts

OrphansX  Incomplete Four-generation Family Tree Chart of ancestors of Peter MacInnes submitted by Susan O’Meara on 2011/05/30 at 5:09 pm | In reply to Angus Macmillan.  Also, Word Document (PDF) of Descendants of Peter McInnes (1), subnmitted by Susan O’Meara

My gg grandparents Mary MacInnes and Alexander Morrison married in Oxford County, Ontario in november 1861. When Mary MacInnes Morrison died in Woodstock in May 1879, her husband, Alexander Morrison, took the three children and dumped them in an orphanage in London, Ontario. Mary MacInnes Morrison’s sister, another Mary MacInnes, who married Alexander Johnston in Woodstock, Ontario, went to the orphanage and pulled my gr garndmother out and took her home to live with her and her new husband. The two youngest children, Peter and Kate Morrison, remained in the orphanage until they were old enough to leave on their own. No one knows what happened to them. After Alexander Morrison put his children in the orphanage, he took off for Chicago.

Editorial Comment:
Apparently about 120,000 destitute and/or orphaned children aged 4-15 were sent from the UK in the 1800s as indentured labourers and farmed out at a price to Canadians as cheap labour. It is now seen as something of a stain on the history of Canada which is portrayed in the film ‘Sunshine and Oranges’, starring Emily Mortimer. Other links on the subject are:

http://content.iriss.org.uk/goldenbridge/migration/journey.html

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~britishhomechildren/

http://etheses.nottingham.ac.uk/276/1/Thy_Children_Own_Their_Birth.pdf

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/home-children/001015-130-e.html

Other Family Trees with Open Queries
Robert Brown’s MacCormicks.
MA Morrison’s Steeles.
Tina MacLeod’s MacInneses.
Neil Johnson’s Johnstones.
Laurie Johnson’s Shaws.
Rhea Kessler’s MacCachrens.
Sherri Smith’s Shaws.
Donald Munro’s Munros.
Kelsie Scutt’s Beatons.
Elizabeth Michos’s MacIntoshes.
Andrew Beachum’s MacKeacheys.
Janet Anney’s MacDonalds.
Miguel’s Elders.
Richard MacQueen’s MacQuiens.
Bruce MacMillan’s MacDonalds.
 

3 responses to “Gallery

  1. Mary Fessler

    November 20, 2011 at 7:18 am

    Saginaw Obituary Website

    Reply to Susan O’ Meara – You and I have corresponded before about O’Henley’s and MacDonalds. There is an obituary for a Catherine Morrison d. 1864 (Saginaw), with no other info, and one for an Alec Morrison d. 1896 in Ontonogan, Michigan on the Saginaw Library website. As many families went from Canada to Saginaw, I thought you might like to check them out. They will send you copies of the obits for free if you want to rule them out.

     
  2. Don MacFarlane

    March 25, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    For no particular reason other than that I love this piece, a song written by that well-known philanderer and Scottish national poet, Rabbie Burns – perhaps written with the love of his life, Highland Mary from Kintyre, in mind. Rabbie is said to have determined to leave his wife for Mary to emigrate to America, but he left Mary waiting in vain in Greenock:

     
  3. Don MacFarlane

    February 19, 2011 at 2:54 pm

    For an extra treat visit the Slideshows at Scottisheye.

     

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